Wednesday, November 7, 2007

Excuses, Excuses

I'm not sure what the topic of this post is. I guess it is an admission that I am passing through a (hopefully brief) period of flagging enthusiasm for keeping my blog as current as possible. It has been a week since I posted anything at all, and a few weeks since I have posted anything resembling valuable contributions to discussion relating to autism (That post, by the way, titled "The Autism ... Continuum?" netted some of the best and most varied comments I have ever received, comments that originated from a very diverse range of people covering various age groups, NT and ASD, several countries - all in all, good stuff).
Don't get me wrong - I don't plan on stopping. Its just that there are so many things going on in my life and in the autism blogosphere that the net effect seems to temporarily be that I haven' got enough creative juice to post as regularly as before.

So what exactly is going on? Let's see...
1) We had tremendous wildfires here in Southern California, which caused a huge week-long distraction. (I actually wrote about that experience).
Also recently occurring are such things as a trip to Disneyland for Jason's birthday, surgery for one of our dogs, school meetings and whatnot, lots and lots of work due to seasonal shifts and covering for out-of-the-office co-workers. Lots to do leaves little time and energy for writing.
2) A favorite blogger (and friend) of mine was threatened and harrassed straight off the internet by "the bad guys". His site always provided a good petri dish for autism-related discussion, as it was frequented by such a diverse group of people. Other people whom I respect and like very much have also stopped or all but stopped blogging. Though, as always, there will be new people entering the community who have great things to offer, that doesn't mean I can't miss the other ones.
3) The more I read about and learn about autism, the more I realize that a non-academic like myself will have a hard time contributing new thoughts to the area I feel most strongly about: improving understanding of the condition of autism and using that understanding to provide better supports for ASD individuals. I am going to keep trying, but I am not one to spend too much time rehashing other people's thoughts or findings. Therefore it is difficult sometimes for me to generate "new material". But I don't want my blog to degenerate into a site like Harold Doherty's where I just grab autism news off the newswire and spin it to launch attacks against those who are ideologically different from me. If I can't take a stab at a careful, reasoned discussion (when that is my intent, not including posts where I am simply celebrating my family or having some fun, then I'd rather not say anything at all.
4) We have three kids now, and they take a tremendous amount of time to care for, attend to, and nurture. And that is priority #1. So devoting the time to keeping up the blog is difficult. I also have a very challenging and demanding career. Again, a good thing, but it does make it hard to keep up the blog.

So anyway, I am going to get my mojo back soon, I expect. There still is much to talk about, much to learn, much to do.

10 comments:

VAB said...

As a person who can't make any kind of comment regarding frequency of posting, let me just say that, when you do post, it is very much appreciated. So slowing down is fine (all the the points you made were very valid) but please don't stop.

hollywoodjaded said...

Your blog posts are always worth the wait. Take care. Take your time.

Another Voice said...

I enjoy your postings whenever they appear; stay with it as time permits.

I particularly enjoyed the thread on the continuum. I learned from the various points of view that were expressed. I found it to be a rich exchange. When that post first appeared I thought of the autism spectrum as a linear function; now I feel comfortable with the visualization of a sphere. In my own way I feel good that someone opened my eyes to another way of thinking.

As far as understanding autism, good luck; I hope someday we all will know what it is. I will say that autism has taught me a great deal about myself. Also, some excellent lessons about love and respect.

Keep up the good work.

isles said...

Agreed! Quality over quantity, and whenever you do have something to say, we'll be there to read.

Ballastexistenz said...

I haven't been blogging much lately. In my case it's been:

1) Health problems.
2) Stressful events offline that have nothing to do with the autistic community at all.
3) Obligations offline.

And I haven't even been able to take care of as many of those obligations (including some that involve helping other autistic people who really need the help) as I want to be right now.

So I completely understand not posting a lot, and I hope to see your posts when they do show up. I agree, quality is more important than quantity (which is sometimes another reason I don't post for awhile).

Niksmom said...

Steve, we're always here when you are ready to share. Besides, if blogging ever feels like a "should" then...well, you shouldn't. Know what I mean? Life and family have to come first.

Anonymous said...

I agree with everything the others have said - slowing down is fine, but please don't stop. There is so much to sort out and learn and we love your "take" on things.

Casdok said...

We will still be here.

Club 166 said...

I haven't posted as regularly myself lately, for many of the same reasons you cited. So it's hard to fault you for not doing a daily post.

Your take on things is always appreciated, Steve. And scientists have a lot to learn from those who don't have scientific backgrounds.

I always check to see if you've posted something, because I know I'll enjoy reading it. There's always some good meaty food for thought in your posts. So like everyone else, I'll be here waiting when the urge hits you.

Joe

Marla Fauchier Baltes said...

I will keep checking back. I also think we all learn by sharing our family struggles and triumphs with autism. To me these are as important as the input of scientists.